I began to wonder what a “greatest hits” of all the health content that we create might look like. - Dalal Haldeman

At Johns Hopkins Medicine, the sheer volume of content that we create for physicians, patients, their families and the world is staggering. In the school of medicine alone, we and our faculty members develop all of the content and multimedia materials for hopkinsmedicine.org. We issue dozens of online and printed publications for physicians, patients and donors; consumer newsletters; a myriad of informational materials; history books; and the school’s alumni magazine. It’s even more astonishing when you consider the many other wonderful and equally voluminous websites, publications and books produced by other schools within The Johns Hopkins University.

A few years ago, I began to wonder what a “greatest hits” of all of the health-focused content that we create across our schools and institutions might look like. I thought of the tremendous potential this idea had to help humanity and support our mission of sharing knowledge, all while showcasing the intellectual and scientific breadth of our faculty. Surely, this would be an engaging way to inform readers.

I knew it wouldn’t be easy—mostly because our schools and institutions operate with tremendous autonomy. After a few inspirational meetings with my colleagues in marketing and communications across the university, we decided to collaborate to bring the idea to life.

Today, I am happy to report that it has come to full fruition in the form of the Johns Hopkins Health Review, a beautiful 80-page publication that features powerful discussion of health today and all that phrase encompasses: medicine, biomedical engineering, economics, public health, politics, nursing, the food system, neuroscience, social sciences and computational science, to name a few. The first issue’s fascinating cover story explores the science behind why we itch, and the article that struck me the most is on why poverty is bad for all of society, regardless of personal economic status.

Published twice a year, the magazine offers practical ideas about nutrition, exercise, sleep habits and relationships, as well as long reads about scientific breakthroughs involving the body, the mind, our communities and our environment—all evidence-based and grounded in Johns Hopkins research. There really is no other magazine that is addressing health in such a broad way. A team of talented people with the right resources made it happen.

I am delighted with the Johns Hopkins Health Review, and I feel fortunate and honored to have joined with my colleagues in its creation.

To request a complimentary subscription to Johns Hopkins Health Review, visit the Johns Hopkins Health Review site and fill out the form at the bottom of the page.

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