Johns Hopkins. Mayo Clinic. Massachusetts General. UCLA. Kaiser.

These are some of the biggest names in health care. And there was a time when having a well-recognized brand was one of the keys to the success of an institution. But in today’s changing health care climate, that’s not always the case.

For highly complex, life-threatening conditions, people will choose places like Johns Hopkins and Mayo, sure. But for more routine care and treatments, people are increasingly interested in convenience and a number of other factors. Take, for example, this data on primary care from the Advisory Board Company.

But this isn’t just happening with primary care. From every type of health care facility, patients and their families expect not just excellent medical care but also the best experience at the right cost to them. That means more compassion and attentiveness from caregivers. It means more comfortable hospital stays, restaurant-quality food and open visiting hours for family members.

A consumer mindset has emerged from the people we serve, and that’s a good thing. As an industry, we understand that care needs to be designed entirely around the patient experience, and everyone—from the big brands to the lesser known—is responding accordingly.

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